Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Spur Syndrome)

Published on by Nidia Klapp

For at least three months, I had been suffering from what I was told is a condition known as Planters Fasciitis, commonly known as a heel spur.” This might sound trivial to most, but I assure you that to me it was not. Heel Spur or Calcaneal Spur is one of the most common causes of heel pain.

Heel pain has multiple causes, but people tend to assume the cause is a heel spur, which is not always the case. They serve to protect the bone against the development of microfractures. Spurs start out as cartilage and progress to solid bone. They are present in about 50 percent of the population, yet not everyone has heel pain— that's the first clue that heel spurs don't always cause heel pain. Micro tears in a ligament called the plantar fascia (a condition known as Bunion Pain often lead to heel pain. When you stand, your foot flattens, leading to elongation of the foot and stretching of the plantar fascia. However, when you resume activity that stretches this band of tissue again, the pain cycle can start all over again.

The body, in it's wisdom, sends bone cells to the area to hold on to the tendon, so it makes logical sense that this could easily be the cause of a bone spur — the build-up of bone cells holding on to the tendon of a tight muscle. Orthotics will bring the floor up to your heel and will therefore make it feel less painful, but it isn't solving the problem. The plantar fascia often tightens as we age for two main reasons.<img class='aligncenter' style='display: block;margin-left:auto;margin-right:auto;' src='http://www.scottmedical.com/image/cache/data/footcare/HeelCradles%20Posted-250x250.jpg' width='253' alt='Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain'/>

The usual advice is to never stretch a cold muscle, but I believe this rule needs to be mostly ignored and taken as a warning against over-stretching when dealing with plantar fasciitis. Tape was the cure for my severe case which began as a result of suddenly increasing in weight and playing volleyball. Losing weight, ice, and stretching would have been enough in my case, but I didn't know how important ice and stretching is, so the inflammation and pain became chronic and tape was necessary. In some people, heel spurs don't cause any problems and are only discovered when the foot is x-rayed for other reasons. Others report feeling pain or irritation when they put pressure on the spur itself. These symptoms can range anywhere from a dull ache to a sharp stabbing pain in the bottom of the foot. Because heel spurs and plantar fasciitis are closely connected the treatments for the two conditions are very similar.

This is most often done through an open procedure as any heel spur or bursa can be removed at the same time. If the spur is not removed during the surgery, it will probably be just as successful, as the large spur is not the true problem. Some physicians use an endoscopic approach (EPF) where a small camera aids the physician during surgery with typically smaller incisions on each side of your foot. Post-operative Care and Risks of surgery for reduction of a heel spur or plantar fasciotomy most likely will involve resting and remaining off of your foot for 2-5 weeks. You should expect some pain following surgery as well as swelling. Especially for the first 48 hours you should keep your leg elevated and occasional ice placed over the area of surgery (about 20 minutes per hour). Patients need to be active in their treatment.<img class='alignright' style='float:right;margin-left:10px;' src='http://www.footcarewv.com/image/89156731_scaled_298x250.jpeg' width='253' alt='Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain'/>

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